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Do you borrow or lend to a friend in need?

Today, in #8 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, we’ll be talking about the difference between these two similar verbs!

 

You don’t want to let grammar get in the way of giving to or getting from your friends.  But the verbs borrow and lend are tricky because they both mean to temporarily give — and yet they are different.

 

The key to using these verbs is understanding that they follow perspective.  Consider who is doing the giving, and who is doing the receiving.

  • Lend focuses on the one who is giving (the one doing the action).
  • Borrow focuses on the one receiving (the one upon whom the action is done).

 

Here are some examples:

I asked her if I could borrow some money.

I asked her if she could lend me some money.

Did you borrow it from her?

Did she lend it to you?

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

Have you had trouble with borrow or lend?

Tell us your story in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_193_How_to_Borrow_Money_in_English_Correctly.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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How do you make small talk in English interesting?

Does it always have to be boring?

Today we talk with Chris Colin about how you can generate great small talk!

 

Come back to our site to get more details and tips

Direct download: AEE_192_How_to_Captivate_People_with_Your_English_Small_Talk.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Can you get success by asking for it?

Today, we talk about one surprisingly simple way to get what you want in your career and life!

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Don’t assume that you can’t have everything in life. A lot of times, you might be surprised what you can get by just asking.

A good strategy is to find ways to negotiate a win-win situation out of something you want.  Everything is negotiable and nothing is set in stone.

Of course, what you’re asking for has to be reasonable, and you need to be able to support your request. If you are asking for something fair and not too bold, you may be surprised to get what you want.  And if not, the very worst that can happen is you receive a No!

 

Have you ever achieved success by just asking?

Tell us about it in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_191_Just_Ask_for_Success.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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How can you get fast English improvement?

How about improvement in 24 hours?

Today, we talk about how you can go from zero to a million in English in only 24 hours!

 

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We all want to be fluent and sound like a native speaker. But we all want it fast! What can you do to get you closer to your goal in only 24 hours?

One thing is to break you bigger goal into smaller, actionable steps that you can actually accomplish. Think about all the little things related to your goal, and what you can do to make them work for you.  Think small, but think hard. There are opportunities for improvement everywhere.

Think also about how you can connect, whether it be to people or the language itself. What small connections can you find or make in a very short time?

 

How will you get closer to your goal in 24 hours?

Any ideas?

Share them with us in the comments section below!


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Talking about your past, should you say did or have done?

Today, in #9 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, we’ll be discussing how to handle past experiences and accomplishments in English!

If somebody says, “I have done that,” how is it different from saying “I did that?”  The difference can seem tricky but the key is the context.

 

Here is a simple way to think about this:

  • When using have done, you are zooming out, outside of yourself and to a big picture.  You might be talking about your entire lifetime, or the distant past.
  • When using did, you are zooming in to something more recent and maybe more simple.  You may also be talking about a specific time period that is now over.

 

Here are some more examples:

  • “I did go to Paris last week.”
  • “I didn’t watch any TV yesterday.”
  • “I have been to Paris, but not since childhood.”
  • “I have watched a lot of TV in my lifetime.”

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

Tell us some of your experiences or accomplishments in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_189_Your_Last_English_Grammar_Problem_Solved.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Can you be happy every day?

If so, what does it take?

Today, we talk with Michael about what you can do to live every day like a vacation!

Come back to our site for more tips and a summary

Direct download: AEE_188_How_to_Be_Happy_Like_Every_Day_is_a_Vacation.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Are you an active English learner?

Or are you waiting for us to give you better English skills?

Today we talk about how improving your English is about what you do, not what we do!

A teacher can only support you and give you the tools you need to help yourself. But improving your English is your responsibility!  Never say “I hope you can improve my English.”  Instead ask yourself, “How can I use All Ears English as a tool to improve my English?

 

Come back to our site for more tips and links

 

Direct download: AEE_187_Why_We_Wont_Make_Your_Bad_English_Good.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Do you want to speak English like a native?

Today we chat with Drew Badger, host of English Anyone, about 3 tips to help you achieve fluency!

We become fluent in our native language by connecting to others. Drew believes we should use the same behavior to get fluent in other languages.  In other words, be a speaker, not just a learner!

 

Come back to our site for links and more info


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Are you interested, or interesting?

What’s the difference?

Today, in #10 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, we’ll be discussing when to use the -ed and -ing endings! 

To be interested is not the same as being interesting.  The same applies to other English phrases such as bored and boring, or excited and exciting.  Here is a general rule to help you remember the difference:

  • When talking about yourself or your feelings, use the –ed ending.  "I am interested in music."
  • When talking about others or something outside yourself, use the –ing ending.  "That music is interesting."

 

Here are some more examples:

  • "She's excited by travel."
  • "Travel is exciting."
  • "They're bored by soccer."
  • "Soccer is boring."

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

What do you find interesting, boring or amazing?

What isn’t interesting, boring or amazing?

Tell us in the comments section below!

 


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Do you need a plan to learn English?

Do you have so many learning resources you’re overwhelmed?

Today we discuss why you need to stop trying to do it all and start creating an English plan!

 

Come back to our post for more tips and a summary

Direct download: AEE_184_Stop_Over-consuming_and_Start_with_an_English_Plan.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT