All Ears English Podcast

Can you use your body to learn English?

Today, Lindsay chats with Jessica Coyle about some of the ways the art of improvisational technique can help you use your body to improve your English!

 

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How do you build a “Brain Box” for the IELTS Listening Exam?

Today Lindsay and Jessica talk about two strategies to make the listening part of the IELTS exam easier!

 

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Do you have trouble understanding American speech habits?

In today’s Tear Up Your Textbook Tuesday, Lindsay and Michelle discuss 5 weird ways Americans use English, and how to understand what they’re saying!

 

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What’s so difficult about the IELTS Speaking Part 1?

What can you do to prepare?

Today, Lindsay and Jessica discuss some tactics for avoiding the dangers and allowing yourself to stand out!

 

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Speaking Part 1 of the IELTS includes questions about yourself.  You will be asked about three topics, and though it may seem like simple stuff, the danger is that you might become too relaxed and start using one-word answers.

You want to do better than that.  In fact, ideally your answers will be 2-4 sentences each!

How can you do come up with that?  Do some brainstorming.  Think of the question words.  Question words can help you think of better answers.

 

Vocabulary is also important in Speaking Part 1.  If you want to achieve a higher score, you will need to use a range of vocabulary, including slang and idioms.  The examiner wants to hear that you know more than what’s in your textbook.  A good strategy is to have a short list of slang and idioms ready to use.

 

What are some good English slang words or idioms that might be helpful to have for Speaking Part 1 of the IELTS test?

Let us know in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_IELTS_2_How_to_Avoid_the_Dangers_on_Speaking_Part_1.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 5:00am EDT

Do you prioritize learning English?

Are you a multi-tasker?

Today, Lindsay and Michelle talk about the famous “to do” list, and whether or not it really moves you forward in your life or your career!

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Direct download: AEE_244_To_Do_or_to_Dont-_That_Is_the_Question.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

How do you persist in learning English?

Do you expect it to ever get easier?

Today, learn how a New York-based painter went from poverty to riches by sticking with it, and how you can achieve success by following his example!

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Direct download: AEE_243_How_a_New_York_Painter_Reached_the_Top_and_How_You_Can_Too.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Can movies cause problems in speaking natural English?

Today, find out why mimicking phrases from movies can make it difficult to have natural-sounding English conversations!

 

Hollywood is drama.  Its stories are fiction.  This means that the language used by characters is often unrealistic.

Because of the unnatural dialogue, you don’t want to quote from movies unless it’s understood that you are quoting.  Native English speakers do it all the time by slightly changing the tone of their voice.  Even then, such quotes are usually made in a context that makes it clear that the usage is a little joke.

 

Some popular American movie quotes:

  • “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.” – Forrest Gump
  • “May the odds be ever in your favor.” – The Hunger Games
  • “May the force be with you.” – Star Wars
  • “Houston, we have a problem.” – Apollo 13

 

While it can be fun to directly quote movies, you want to try to sound more like a real English speaker, not a fictional character.

 

Do you have any favorite movie quotes in English?

Share the ones you love in the comments section below!

 


Do you need a plan for Writing Task 1 on the IELTS exam?

Today, Lindsay and Jessica share two clear steps for helping you beat it!

 

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The IELTS exam’s written section is divided into two tasks.  Task 1 requires you to interpret a map or chart in approximately 150 words, while Task 2 is about 250 words on your own thoughts.  Even though it is longer, Task 2 is often easier for test-takers.  Task 1, because of the vocabulary needed, can be much more difficult.

The Task 1 chart is usually some kind of line or graph that shows a change over time.  To give yourself the language needed to discuss this chart, a good tactic might be to read the business section of the newspaper and pick up the vocabulary you need – words like that describe change, like increase, decrease, decline and skyrocket.

 

In writing your answer for Task 1, keep it clear and simple.  A good plan might be to discuss increases in paragraph one, and decreases in paragraph two.  That way, your answer is organized.

 

How are you preparing for the IELTS exam’s Task 1?

Share your thoughts in the comments section below! 

Direct download: AEE_Test_Talk_IELTS_How_to_Beat_Writing_Task_1_on_the_IELTS.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 5:00am EDT

Do you have trouble using English modals?

Today, Lindsay and Michelle give you three crazy role-plays to understand when to use should, could and would!

 

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Correct use of modals like should, could and would can be confusing.  All three deal with time and possibility, and all three involve telling or asking someone to do something.

 

Should describes the strong possible likelihood of something.  It is also used to give advice.

  • “I should arrive on time.”
  • “You should apply for the job.”

 

Could describes a possibility in the past or the future.  It can also be used as a polite request.

  • “She could have eaten dinner already.”
  • “Could you pick me up at the airport?”

 

Would is most commonly used to make a polite request.

  • “Would you like to come with me?”
  • “Would you ask him about the book?”

 

How can you use should, could and would?

Give us some examples in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_241_Could_You_Listen_Would_You_Listen_You_Should_Listen.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Are you preparing to take the IELTS exam?

Today, Lindsay and Jessica discuss what you need to know to pass with the score you want!

 

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Direct download: AEE_TEST_TALK_IELTS_How_the_Pros_Prepare_for_the_IELTS.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 5:00am EDT

Do you have trouble writing an email in English?

Do you worry about what kind of impression you’re making?

Today, Lindsay and Michelle share four common email mistakes made by non-native English speakers, and how to correct them!

 

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Have you ever thought about taking the TOEIC?

On today’s Test Talk, Lindsay and Jessica talk about using prediction in testing, and how it can help!

 

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When getting a bank account, cell phone, or internet connection in a foreign country, you need to be able to ask questions and know the right structures of conversation.  If you don’t, you might not be told all of the information you need to know.

By practicing, especially if you’re able to do so with a partner, you can learn to anticipate what might be said by the other person.  Doing this is learning to predict, and see what you’re missing.  It might make you a better test-taker.

 

A practice conversation might go like this:

  • “I need to open a bank account.”
  • “Okay, to open an account, please complete this form.”

 

  • “Where should I take the form?”
  • “Give it to the woman in the office down the hall.”

 

  • “When can I have my account?  Today?”
  • “No, it takes two weeks.”

 

  • “Do you need my passport?”
  • “Yes, and your birth certificate.”

 

If you would like to learn about this strategy, hear advice on how to strengthen it with resources that are free online, and get a practice guide written by Jessica, purchase the full episode.

 

Are you taking the TOEIC-1?

If so, let us know in the comments section below!


On today’s Deep Thoughts Thursday, Lindsay and Michelle consider a quote from Teddy Roosevelt, 26th President of the United States.

 

When he was a child, Teddy Roosevelt was weak, sickly and asthmatic.  He had poor eyesight, too.  Yet he grew up to be one of America’s greatest symbols of achievement and individual strength.  His attitude continues to inspire today, and is summed up in the following quote:

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Direct download: AEE_239_Say_NO_to_the_Naysayer_When_It_Comes_to_Your_English.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Are you thinking about testing in English?

Today, Lindsay introduces Jessica, the Examiner of Excellence, who’s here to help you excel at your English tests!

 

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Test preparation doesn’t have to be boring.  In fact, it should be interesting.  When you’re studying for an English test, it isn’t the same as studying for a math test.  You need to activate your emotions so you can remember more.

Reading or watching movies in English can help, but you can also practice writing essays on subjects that are interesting to you, or go out and speak English with native speakers.  Think of it as test preparation.

 

As for taking the actual test, Jessica has four essential tips to give you an advantage:

  • Be proactive.  Take an active approach that involves your brain.  Try to think about and predict answers.
  • Trust yourself.  Don’t start doubting yourself when answering questions.  Often, your first answer is the correct one.
  • Follow directions.  Tests are written by smart people.  Don’t start looking ahead and trying to race the clock.  If you do, you might miss an important instruction.
  • Don’t rush.  Don’t worry about timing.  Instead, focus on your English and do what the test asks you to do.

 

Have you done any testing in English?

How did it go?

Tell us about it in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_Test_Talk_Meet_the_Examiner_of_Excellence.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 5:00am EDT

Are you sometimes unsure what to do next in life and with your English learning?

Today Lindsay and Michelle talk about how to proceed when life feels overwhelming!

 

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Direct download: AEE_238_How_to_Rock_Your_English_Learning.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Do you ever need to comfort others in English?

On today’s Tear Up Your Textbook Tuesday, Lindsay and Michelle teach you a simple trick for boosting egos and helping others see the brighter sad of unhappy situations!

 

When someone you know tells you something sad, but not too serious, there’s a trick in English to help make them feel better.  By putting ‘though’ at the end of a sentence, and raising the intonation, you can emphasize something positive about the situation in order to make the speaker feel better

 

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Do you have an information addiction?

Today, Lindsay and Michelle will have a natural English conversation about how information addiction can affect your life, and what you can do to unplug!

 

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Direct download: AEE_236_Warning_Information_Is_Habit_Forming_How_to_Unplug.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Do you know when to take advantage of an opportunity?

On today’s Deep Thoughts Thursday, Lindsay and Michelle talk about the biggest decisions in life, and how to make them!

 

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The American comedy actor Milton Berle once said, “If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.”

The suggestion is, if opportunities in life do simply come to you, then you should go out and look for opportunities yourself.  But which ones should you pursue, and which should you let go?

The worst would be to not explore an opportunity that attracts you, and then have regrets about it later.  Sometimes you’re afraid, and sometimes others get in the way of opportunities.  Life’s short, so don’t let that happen!

Find a quiet place to think about opportunities when you encounter them so you don’t pass up something good.

 

Have you had to make your own opportunities?

Share your story in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_235_When_Opportunity_Knocks_What_Do_You_Do.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Are you nervous about speaking English?

Are you looking for a way around it?

Today, Lindsay and Michelle share a story about one student who overcame his fear of speaking English by being an expert at something else!

 

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An English student in an American business course had little confidence in his English abilities.  But when the other students in his course discovered that he understood their subject better than any of them, he was asked to be their tutor.  Of course, they wanted him to tutor them in English.

This turned out much better than expected.  As a tutor, he had to be in the moment and focused.  He couldn’t worry about his inhibitions or nervousness, or making mistakes.  And because of this, he was able to take control.

 

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A classroom is a safe place to learn English, but you are expected not to make mistakes, and so you must focus on your own perfection rather than connection.  Connecting with others is more natural.  Try to get out of the classroom and overcome your inhibitions.

 

How do you practice English outside the classroom?

Does it help make you less self-conscious about speaking English?

Let us know in the comments section below!


Need some help talking about your plans in English?

On today’s Tear Up Your Textbook Tuesday, Lindsay and Michelle tell you how to talk about the future the way native speakers do!

 

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Usually English textbooks tell you to talk about the future using ‘will’ and ‘going to’.  These work, but native English speakers also do it by using the progressive tense.  To native ears, this is a more natural and conversational way to talk.

 

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Here are some examples of conversation about the future using the progressive tense:

  • “What are you having for dinner?”
  • “Tonight I’m having chicken.”

 

  • “Are you bringing anything?”
  • “I’m bringing wine.”

 

  • “What are you doing tomorrow?”
  • “I’m going to see a movie.”

 

Note that all of these conversations are talking about the future, not the immediate moment.

 

What are you doing tomorrow?

What are you doing next week?

Let us know in the comments section below!


Do you want to get a job in the US?

Today, Lindsay and Michelle discuss what you need to know to excel at an American job interview!

 

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Job interviews everywhere focus on skills and training.  But in the US, employers are usually interested in character as well.  They want to know whether you’re a team player, what your potential is to be a leader, and how you will grow in your job.

As such, they might ask some questions focused more on your behaviors than your skills.  It would help to think about these questions ahead of time, so you can be prepared.

 

Some American job interview questions might include:

  • “Tell us about the most difficult/frustrating individual you ever had to work with, and how you managed to work with them.”  By asking this, they’re seeing whether you can rise above a problem and keep it from affecting the company.
  • “Give an example of how you’ve broken out of a routine or when you’ve successfully developed a new approach.”  Here they’re asking you to show flexibility.
  • “How do you schedule your time/prioritize time when you have a tight turnaround?”  With this, you might want to explain how you ask others for help or delegate your work.

 

In answering all of these questions, try to tell a story from conflict to resolution, and keep it under three minutes if possible.

 

Do employers ask questions like these during job interviews in your country?

Tell us about it in the comments section below!

 

 

Brad received his undergraduate degree at New York University in 1984, and spent the next 15 years in the business world focused on sales and marketing.  After spending a year testing the English teaching waters in Korea, he returned to the USA and got a Masters degree in TESOL from Seattle University in March 2001.

Since then Brad has worked in London for a summer, spent a few years in Ireland writing TEFL materials for the Wall Street Institute and other companies, and has worked in Germany and Austria as an in-house Business English trainer for companies like Siemens, Deutsche Post/DHL and EADS.

He has also taught many seminars and workshops for various companies on skills like presentations and business correspondence, as well as a business course for two years at the University of Ulm, Germany.

 

How to Work with Brad on italki:

Step 1- Go to italki to get $10 off your second lesson. You must use this link to get the special deal.

Step 2- Search for “Brad C” in the teacher search bar after you have registered with the above link for our special promotion.


Do you ever take a risk when learning English?

Or would you rather be ordinary and routine?

Today, Lindsay and Michelle discuss how not being a play-it-safer can help your English grow!

 

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Do you want some help with the local English in San Francisco?

Today, San Francisco native Sarah Honour talks about how you can go local with your English in the City by the Bay!

 

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San Francisco is one of the most unique and amazing cities in the United States.  It’s residents are technology-centric due to their proximity to Silicon Valley, as well as health-centric and nature-centric due to the progressive philosophy that has long been part of the spirit of the city.

Sarah believes that these traits are found in some of the language that San Franciscans use, and that knowing this terminology can help you fit in just a little better.

 

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Here are Sarah’s three top terms for your visit to San Francisco:

  • “Is there an app for that?”:  App is short for application, as in for your phone.  Because the Bay Area is near the center of a major technological development region, there are apps for almost everything in the city — from calling a taxi to getting your groceries delivered.
  • Organic, Local, Sustainable and Seasonal: Food quality is really important to San Franciscans.  Organic means that no pesticides have been used, local means the food was grown nearby, and sustainable means the environment was not harmed to produce it.  Seasonal simply means that it is the natural time of year for the food to grow.
  • “Where’s the wiggle?”: San Francisco is a great city for biking, but it is also a city with lots of hills.  The ‘wiggle’ is the route for biking with the least amount of hills to go up.

 

Have you ever been to San Francisco?

Would you like to go?

Tell us why in the comments section below!

 

Sarah is a 31 year old American who was born and raised in Denver, Colorado, studied Communications in Seattle, Washington, and worked for almost 10 years as a nanny (or babysitter) in San Francisco, California.  She now splits her time between San Francisco and Sardinia, Italy where her boyfriend lives. She is an English teacher on italki, and is learning Italian and sampling as much of the amazing food and wine from Italy as she can.


How do you clarify information in English?

Have you ever met someone on the phone or the internet before you met them in person?

Today, Lindsay and Michelle discuss tag questions, and how they can help you confirm what you think you know, but aren’t sure about!

 

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A tag question helps you to confirm a piece of information that you think is true, but that you want to clarify.  Though they are used as a tool for clarity, they can also be a great way to create conversations.

Tag questions tend to begin with the statement to be clarified, and then end with the question.  There are many possible combinations.

 

Some common examples of tag questions include:

  • “You’re from Washington, aren’t you?”
  • “You used to live in New York, didn’t you?”
  • “He can play the piano, can’t he?”
  • “Her birthday is in July, right?”

 

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Do you ever use tag questions?

What kinds of things do you need to confirm or clarify in others?

Let us know in the comments section below!


Do you want to start a conversation in English?

Today, Lindsay introduces and talks about conversations with Michelle Kaplan, the new All Ears English co-host!

 

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Michelle was born in Washington DC but now lives in New York City.  She’s musical, likes basketball, and has some unusual tastes in food.  Most importantly, she’s the new All Ears English co-host.

In her premier episode, Michelle talks with Lindsay and offers some simple conversation starters in English.

 

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In conversing with someone new, it’s good to look for things you have in common.  But first you need some basic information.  Here are some great starter questions that might lead to larger discussions:

    • Where are you from (originally)? Is your family still there? Do you visit them often?
    • What are you into? What do you do for fun? (this is like asking, What are your hobbies?, but more natural)
    • Did you go to college? Where?
    • Do you watch any sports?

 

Do you have any other conversation starters?

Share your thoughts in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_228_Meet_Michelle_The_New_York_Radio_Girl.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

How can you improve your English conversations?

Is conversation a science?

Find out today as Lindsay talks with Travis Wolven about the poetics of conversation!

Come back to our site for more info and tips

 

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What should be your focus when learning English?

How can you make the most of the time you invest in studying?

Today Lindsay talks with Nick Vance about the 80/20 principle, and how it can improve your English conversations!

 

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Nick believes that 80% of the positive benefits of something come from 20% of the input.  In business, some customers are more valuable than others.  With friends, though you may have many, only a few are truly close.

In learning English, most of the grammar mistakes a new learner makes are really the same mistake over and over.  Correcting these most common 20% of mistakes would eliminate 80% of all grammar mistakes.  The best way to identify these is by working with a teacher who can help point out your mistakes.

 

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Another way to work with the 80/20 principle is to prepare answers to the most common questions you might get from native English speakers.  This will help you comfortably get conversations started — which is probably 80% of the work!

You might prepare answers to questions like:

  • Where are you from?
  • How long have you lived here?
  • What do you do for a living?

 

Do you see the 80/20 principle working in your life?

How so?

Share your thoughts with us in the comments section below!

 

 

How to book a lesson with Nick!

Step 1: Go to our special italki link to get $10 USD off of your second lesson

Step 2: After you have enrolled through the promo page to get your discount, search for NickVance in the teacher search bar

 

Nick Vance is originally from Kentucky and has lived in North Carolina, Washington DC, San Diego and Portland.  He has been living in Berlin, Germany for 2.5 years.  Nick’s degree is in math but he left that field when he realized how much he enjoyed helping others learn English.
 
 
Nick has been helping people improve their English for 4 years and have been teaching online via Italki for about one year.

How do you get a job in the United States?

What do employers want and expect?

Today, Lindsay and Kristy talk about 3 things an employer in the U.S. might look for in a job candidate!

 

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If you’re applying for a job, it’s important to know what your potential employer is looking for.  Like any other country, the U.S. has a professional culture which places more value on some individual qualities than others.  These qualities may be very different from what employers look for in your home country!

 

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Some qualities American employers seek in employees:

  • Proactive attitude: Show that you are autonomous and energetic – the opposite of passive.  It means to show up early, confirm the time you will meet, and say thank you.
  • Positive attitude: Americans like smiles.  But it’s also important that you get along with others and not be pessimistic.
  • Communication: When you actively communicate it shows you are engaged.  A big part of this is simply that you let the boss know what is going on.
  • Be a “Giver”: Show that you believe in the vision of the company and are personally invested in its success.  In other words, it’s more than a job to you.

 

Are these the same traits that employers look for in your country?

Do you have them?

Let us know in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_225_3_Secrets_to_Getting_a_Job_in_the_United_States.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Do you have grit for learning English?

Today, Lindsay talks with Sarah Scala about the importance of persistence, both in life and in learning English! 

 

Resilience is the ability to pick yourself up after a setback, and keep going.  It’s an important ability, and it’s also something we can improve in ourselves.

But Sarah believes that grit is even more important.  Grit is your ability to stay focused, over the long term.  It enables a person to be nimble and accept the ups and downs without losing focus.

 

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Sarah has three suggestions for developing your own grit and resilience in learning English:

  • Be meaningfully interested.  Find a way to connect to English in a way that is not superficial.
  • Have a growth mindset.  Your brain has the ability to change and evolve, and that will make it easier to succeed and harder to fail.  Attune your thinking to this inherent ability.
  • Practice.  The only way to become an expert is to work at it.

 

How much resilience and grit do you have?

How does it show?

Tell us about it in the comments section below!

 

 

As a dynamic consultant, coach, and educator, Sarah Scala has over 15 years of experience in supporting organization development, leadership, and change management.

Sarah brings high energy, adaptability, and openness to new challenges. She has substantial experience in global leadership development, executive coaching, learning design, and team effectiveness.

Sarah has led development initiatives for start-ups to Fortune 500 companies in industries such as global manufacturing, financial services, legal, consumer packaged goods, pharmaceutical, medical, consulting, and education.

Visit Sarah’s Website Here

 

Learn More About Grit and Resilience!


Want to improve your English conversation? Learn from a tennis pro!

What can it teach us?

Today, Lindsay and Kristy talk about what they've learned about language learning from tennis lessons!

 

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In tennis, as in many other sports, it’s critical that you persist.  You have to keep trying.  You have to show up for practice, and be consistent.  Mental toughness is also important.  You want to have the upper hand and be offensive, rather than defensive.

When learning a new language, sometimes we get stuck on a negative thought or an embarrassment.  This can lead us to lose the upper hand, and our confidence.  But when we sound good, we feel more in control.  The point is to practice, and to try to keep the ball in your court.  Stay in the game and take a deep breath!

 

PrintAre You Ready to Practice? Get a Private, Native English Teacher Now!

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Do you think tennis (or any other sports) offer lessons to language learning?

What are some examples?

Let us know what you think in the comments section below?


Have you found your Zone of Genius yet?

Today, Lindsay and Kristy continue to discuss the Zone of Genius concept, and what you can do to find success in English and in life by discovering it in yourself!

Come back to our site for more

 

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The Zone of Genius is where your innate talent and your greatest passion come together, in a way that matters to you.  It is not about improving weaknesses, but rather amplifying strengths.

Inhibitions can hold us back in life.  That is why it’s important to seek out your Zone of Genius and how it applies to your life, your relationships, and your careers.  If you feel afraid, you might be on the right track.

 

What is your Zone of Genius?

How do you know?

Tell us about it in the comments section below!


When should you use the word ‘the’ in English?

Today, in #1 of the Top 15 Fixes series, we discuss the most common article in the English language, ‘the’!

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Use if the word ‘the’ can be a confusing.  But there are some rules that can help you get it right most of the time.

 

The first requires that you consider whether the focus is on something specific, or something more general.

When focused on specific items, use ‘the’.  If you’re sitting at a table, talking about the food that is actually in front of you, you might say:

  • “Do you like the turkey?”
  • “Yes, the turkey is great!”
  • “Could you please pass the salt?”

When focused on more general terms, you don’t use ‘the’.  If you’re discussing food in general, you might say:

  • “Do you like turkey?”
  • “Have you tried pumpkin pie?”
  • “Cranberries are too tart for me.”

 

Geographical terms can also be tricky for ‘the’.  In most cases, large, well-known geographic places will have ‘the': the content, the Pacific Ocean, the moon.

With specific countries, a country’s formal name might require ‘the,’ while a less formal name might not: the United States, the Russian Federation; America, Russia.

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

What have you found difficult about ‘the’?

Tell us all about it in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_221_When_to_Use_The_at_Thanksgiving_Dinner.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Do you have a potential for genius?

How can you access it?

Today Lindsay talks with Laura Garrett, creator of the Zone of Genius Assessment, about how you can discover your own zone of genius!

 

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The Zone of Genius is your innate talents combined with your purpose.  Your talent is what you’re naturally good at, and it is unique to you.  Your purpose is your main challenge in life – this may not be so unique.  In fact, many others may have the same challenge, and there may be an opportunity for you to help them while helping yourself.

 

italki1Can’t find native speakers to practice English with you?

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Laura offers four tips to finding your Zone of Genius:

  • Identify your talent: Ask your colleagues what they see as your unique approach to the work you do. You may have overlooked something about yourself!
  • Identify your challenges: Look at your past. What did you struggle with? What was hard? What did you overcome, and how did you help others?
  • Ask yourself weekly: What are you excited about at work? Are you bored or interested? Why or why not?
  • Look back on your past week: What impact did you have? Does it satisfy you?

 

What do you think of the Zone of Genius concept?

Let us know in the comments section below!

 

 

Laura Garnett is a Performance Strategist, speaker and the creator of The Zone of Genius Assessment — a powerful process that clarifies your unique talent and purpose, to produce greater impact, results and fulfillment at work.

She speaks at events and conferences across the country, including TEDx, and is a regular contributor to Inc.com, The Huffington Post and the Zappos Delivering Happiness blog.

Prior to launching her own New York-based consultancy, Laura honed her marketing, branding and mission-refining skills at companies like Capital One, American Express, IAC and Google.

Visit Laura’s website, sign up for her newsletter and take an assessment to see if you are living and working in your Zone of Genius!


Are you free to follow your goals in life?

Or are you afraid?

Today, learn how freedom comes with fearlessness!

Come back to allearsenglish.com/219 for more!

 

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There are so many things to be afraid of: loneliness, lack of money, professional failure or meaninglessness. Fears can overwhelm you.  But what if you have a vision that’s bigger than fear?

To accomplish anything, you have to get out of your head and into your body. Action means letting go of your thoughts.  But to do that, you need the freedom to be fearless.

 

Freedom to be fearless means:

  • Questioning everything
  • Avoiding “perfectionist paralysis”
  • Having goals, but knowing that goals are not always the most important thing
  • Being able to communicate effectively with others when the stakes are high

 

Are you free and fearless?

How does it come out in your life?

Tell us your story in the comments section below!



Do you say By Yourself or On Your Own in English?

Come back to allearsenglish.com/217 for more help!

Today, in #2 of our Top 15 Fixes series, we discuss these two phrases and how to use them when you’re doing something alone!

 

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By yourself and on your own are two phrases that may look different, but their meanings are essentially identical.  Both are used to say that you’ve done something alone, rather than with others.

Even though their meaning is the same, you want to be careful that you don’t mix up the prepositions between these phrases. The best way to avoid that is to learn each one as a chunk.  And the best way to do that is to practice!

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

What do you like to do by yourself?

What do you like to do alone?

Let us know in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_217_By_Yourself_vs._On_Your_Own_in_English.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Are you an adult living at home with your parents?

Did you know that American culture discourages this?

Today, find out why Americans feel compelled to move out of their family home at age 18 – even if they don’t have enough money to do so!

 

Come back to our site for more info

 

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Direct download: AEE_216_Find_Out_Why_Americans_Dont_Want_to_Live_at_Home.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Do you surround yourself with doers?

Is it important to spend time with others who appreciate your dreams?

Today, we talk about why it’s a good idea to hang out with people who can do and dream, and one action you can take to build a supportive social circle!

 

Come back to our site for more tips

 

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Do you dream without fear?

Do you link your English studies to your big goals?

Today, learn about one All Ears English listener who has an incredible goal and dream for his English – and why it’s making all the difference in his life!

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Sergin is an All Ears English listener in Turkey. He listens to English conversations 4-8 hours every day!  His goal is to become an actor and move to Hollywood.  That may sound like an ambitious dream, but it is possible.

Dreaming big is the only way to achieve big things.  And it’s important to have a goal that you care about. What you’re doing must inspire you and hold your attention.  Find what you want to do in life, not just what you should do!

 

Do you have any big dreams or goals connected to learning English?

Tell us all about them in the comments section below!

 


Come back to allearsenglish.com/213 for more info!

What’s the difference between do and make in English?

Do you make something, or do you do it?

Today, in #3 of our Top 15 Fixes, we talk about the difficulty of distinguishing when to use these two verbs!

 

Many English learners have difficulty using do and make, often because they are directly translating from their own language. But native English speakers make it even more difficult.  Even though there are some basic rules for using these verbs, native speakers tend to break them.

 

 

Make usually means to create something, from the ground up. Some examples include:

  • Making food, a drink, or anything requiring ingredients
  • Making friends (creating friendships)
  • Making the bed or table (putting things together)
  • Making a phone call, or making mistakes

 

Do usually relates more to a responsibility, an action or a job. Some examples include:

  • Doing dinner, coffee or drinks (something you do together, with others)
  • Doing homework, or doing the dishes (doing a job or work)
  • Doing someone a favor
  • Doing your best

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

 

 

What do you make?

What do you do?

Let us know in the comments section at allearsenglish.com/213

Direct download: AEE_213_Do_Yourself_a_Favor_-_Learn_Make_vs._Do_in_English.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

How do you make friends in New York?

What do you need to know?

Today, we discuss one little part of making it in the Big Apple!

 

Come back to our site for more!

 

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Do you know how to celebrate Halloween like an American?

Today, we discuss how Americans celebrate this strange holiday, and how learning English will allow you to celebrate Halloween all year!

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Halloween is a popular traditional American holiday. For many Americans, it is their favorite holiday.

Among the many activities Americans engage in, the most important for celebrating Halloween is dressing up in a costume.

Adults might dress up for parties, and kids might dress up for trick or treating. This is a chance to be somebody different and to reinvent yourself!

Learning a new language can also allow you to take on a new personality. A new culture and language might mix with your unique personality to make you into someone 'different'.  Speaking a new language is thus like Halloween all year!

 

Do you celebrate Halloween in your country?

What do you do?

Tell us all about it in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_211_Find_Out_How_Americans_Celebrate_Halloween.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Is learning English up to you?

Today, we talk with Steve Kaufmann, founder of English LingQ about how your English learning goals are closer than you think!

 

Come back to our site to learn more

 

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Is it correct to ask how much, or how many in English?

Today, in #4 of the Top 15 Fixes series, we discuss using the words 'much' and 'many' when discussing quantities!

 

It’s important to think of the meaning of the words much and many, and how each is used differently in counting.

 

If you're counting something as a mass that can be spilled on the table so that it goes everywhere, you would use the word 'much'. Examples include:

  • Grainy or powdery substances like sugar or flour
  • Liquids, semi-liquids or semi-solids like milk, honey or butter
  • Money (when considered abstractly, as in “too much money”)

 

If you are counting individual pieces, use the word 'many'. Examples include:

  • Grains such as sugar counted individually
  • Groups of items, like chocolate chips, marshmallows or berries
  • Countable units, such as cups, teaspoons or bags

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

Do you have any examples for using much and many in your baking or cooking?

Share with us in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_209_Baking_Many_Cookies_with_Lindsay_and_Gabby.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Do you speak English like an American?

Do you wish you did?

Today, learn 3 ways to sound a little more like an American when you speak English!

Come back to our site for more tips from Amy

 

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Do you plan for your priorities?

Do you run your day, or does your day run you?

Today we discuss how planning your day can help you accomplish your priorities!

 

If you don’t decide how you’ll manage you time, someone else will. It’s simple to understand but easy to forget.

 

Come back to our site for more expert tips

 

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Direct download: AEE_207_How_to_Run_Your_Day_the_Right_Way.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Today we discuss a big mistake you’re making with "miss" and "lose" when you talk about missing the bus in English!

 

If you take the bus or train, what do you say when you discover it has already come and gone without you?

“I lost the bus,” is a common mistake.  The problem with saying this is that it suggests you owned the bus, but no longer know where it is.  A person can lose their keys or their wallet, but they can only lose their bus if they’re a bus driver!

Come back to our site for more tips

 

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How do you talk about people in English?

Is the word “people” plural or singular?

Today, in #5 of the Top 15 Fixes, we discuss a mistake you might be making when you translate your native language into English – and how to fix it!

 

 

In some languages, the word for “people” is singular. But it’s important to remember that, in English, this word is plural.

  • People are interesting.
  • NOT: People is interesting.

 

The singular term for “people” is “person.” This is similar to the situation with the words “children” and “child.”

  • The children are good.
  • The children are energetic.
  • The child is good.
  • The child is energetic.

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

Have you had trouble with the plural and singular of these words?

Does it come from translating from your own language?

Let us know in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_205_How_to_Fix_a_Translation_Mistake.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Would you like advice from an expert English teacher?

Today, we talk with Tony from italki.com about 3 outside-the-box ways to improve your English!

 

Come back to our site to learn more

 

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Do you take time to reflect on your English learning?

Today we talk about how spending 15 minutes on one specific action could save you hours of work later!

 

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Direct download: AEE_203_How_to_Reflect_Your_Way_to_English_Fluency.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Come back to our site for more

Can you use your body to increase your confidence in English speaking?

Today, learn what poses can make you more comfortable and powerful!

 

Social psychologist Amy Cuddy says body language affects how we think, and how others think about us. When people are slouched and closed-in on themselves, they not only feel less powerful, but they appear less powerful to others.

Consider: Are your shoulders  slouched?  Or are they back, with your chest open?  Are you spreading yourself out physically?  Are you smiling?  Is your body upright?

 

 

Tips for power-posing your way to confidence:

  • Stand with your arms up, legs spread out, shoulders back and chest out.  Take up space and breathe deeply!
  • If you can't do this at the moment, imagine you’re doing it, or do it in the bathroom before your important interview or presentation.  You can even do it while talking on the phone.
  • Yawn! By yawning, we are naturally bringing oxygen to our brain, which makes us feel more alert and confident.

 

Have you tried power posing?

Has it worked for you?

Tell us your story in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_202_Pose_Your_Way_to_Confidence_in_English.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Come back to our website for more

When you’re talking about the future in English, should you use “will” or “going to”?

Today, in #6 of the Top 15 Fixes, we discuss the correct way to tell others what you want to do, whether in the immediate future or many years from now!

 

"Will" and "going to" are interchangeable in meaning, but native English speakers tend to use them for slightly different purposes.

 

Will is often used in the context of a big plan or dream, often in the far future:

  • I will get married, eventually.
  • “Someday, people will live on Mars.”

 

However, Will can also be used if you have just spontaneously made a decision, at this very moment, or for promises:

  • “Maybe I will go out to lunch.”
  • “I will always love you.”

 

Going to is used for more specific decisions about your immediate future:

  • “I’m gonna (going to) go biking tomorrow.”
  • “She’s going to call later tonight.”

 

Are You Ready to Practice? Get a Private, Native English Teacher Now!

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These rules are general. Remember, there are exceptions, and native speakers can be inconsistent.  The best way to learn is to get out and hear native English speakers, and use the language the way you hear it spoken.

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

What will you do in the future?

What are you going to do?

Tell us about it in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_201_Finally_Solve_Your_Confusion_with_Will_and_Going_to.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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How should you talk about money in American culture?

Today, we discuss what you should and shouldn't ask Americans about money!

 

Americans tend to think it rude to discuss personal finances and financial decisions. This may be due to the basic American value of faith in an egalitarian society.  But whatever the reason, money is a touchy subject, and questions about it alienate or even upset an American.

 

Come back to our site for details

Direct download: AEE_200_How_to_Talk_About_Money_in_American_Culture.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Are you a perfectionist when it comes to learning English?

If you are, then you are not alone!

Today we have an awesome guest! Today Jun from Hapa Eikaiwa is here to talk about how you can beat this problem.

Do you feel like you are afraid of making mistakes or that everything that you say has to be perfect?

Jun has found that a lot of his students rehearse their sentences in their heads and can’t jump into a conversation and express themselves because of perfectionism.

Do you think more than you talk?

Come back to our site for more


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Are you an English amateur or a pro?

Today we talk about the work from author Steven Pressfield and what it means for your English learning.

 

Who’s a Pro?

The pro artist or English learner or entrepreneur will show up every day and will do the work.

He will move past the thoughts that tend to make him get side-tracked.

The pro is present in his studies and his work. He doesn’t repeat negative thoughts or make excuses.

Are you a pro when it comes to learning English?

 

Who’s an Amateur?

He  might make excuses for not being fluent in English.

The amateur might decide that his lack of English skills is because he doesn’t have a good teacher, or good resources, or the right opportunities.

Are you an amateur English learner?

 

Can’t find native speakers to practice English with you?

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Tell us in the comments!

Are you an English amateur or an English pro?

Why?

Can you share a strategy to help other AEE listeners “turn pro”?

 

 

 

Direct download: AEE_198_Are_You_an_English_Amateur_or_Pro.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Do you know who pays for lunch when you go out with English speakers?

This might be a source of serious confusion for you if you are making the mistake of translating the word "invite" from your native language to English!

Today you'll learn how to avoid one of the most awkward possible misunderstandings when you go out for lunch!

Today is number 7 of our Top 15 Fixes to Tune up Your Porsche!

 

Are You Ready to Practice? Get a Private, Native English Teacher Now!

Try italki to learn to speak like a native.

You'll get your English mistakes corrected immediately!

For a limited time you'll get 10UD to use towards private English lessons on italki

Visit italki now to claim your 10USD in free English lessons.

 

 

What does it mean when you "invite" someone out for dinner or for lunch?

The verb "invite" just means to extend an invitation to someone to go out and do something together. It does NOT mean that you will pay for the person's meal.

Are you translating this verb and its meaning from your native language into English?

A lot of people make this mistake!

In English when we invite someone to dinner we aren't sure who is going to pay.

 

If you do want to pay for someone you can say:

  • "I've got this"
  • "I got this"
  • "Let me get this"
  • "This one's on me"
  • "I'll take this"
  • "Don't worry about it. I've got this"

 

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

Episode 165: Listen or Hear?

Episode 169: Speak, Talk, Tell and Say?

Episode 173: Wish vs. Hope

Episode 177: Talking About Age in English

Episode 181: Future Tense in English

Episode 185: Interested or Interesting?

Episode 189: Talking About the Past

 

How do you deal with paying for the bill in your culture?

Is it ok to refuse when someone offers to pay for you or should you accept?

How do you think your culture is different from American culture in this sense?

Leave us a message in the comments and let's have a conversation!


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Do you want to maximize your English learning and get fluent in English faster?

Today you'll learn how to maximize your English learning by using spreadsheets with Jane Lawson from Daily Step!

You'll also learn two other very cool tips to speak English like a native.

 

Come back to our site to get specific tips and tricks


Americans love to use English slang. Would you like to sound more American when you speak English?

Today we talk about four common slang combinations you can use to sound more like a native!

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As with other people and languages, Americans tend to bridge words and speak quickly.  This can have the effect of shortening and even creating entirely new words.

 

Here are four slang combination-words that you are likely to hear when around Americans:

  • wanna (want to): “I wanna go out tonight.”
  • shoulda (should have): “I shoulda told the truth.”
  • gonna (going to): “He’s gonna go to a movie later.”
  • gotta (got to): “She says she’s gotta work.”

Come back to our site for more examples

 

 

Direct download: AEE_195_4_Tips_to_Instantly_Sound_More_American_in_English.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Should you do a free language exchange instead of an English lesson?

Today, we discuss why this might be a mistake!

 

Language exchanges are a big topic in language learning.  They’re popular because they’re both fun and free.  But they do have some downfalls and sometimes a real teacher is better.

 

Come back to our site for more info and tips

 


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Do you borrow or lend to a friend in need?

Today, in #8 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, we’ll be talking about the difference between these two similar verbs!

 

You don’t want to let grammar get in the way of giving to or getting from your friends.  But the verbs borrow and lend are tricky because they both mean to temporarily give — and yet they are different.

 

The key to using these verbs is understanding that they follow perspective.  Consider who is doing the giving, and who is doing the receiving.

  • Lend focuses on the one who is giving (the one doing the action).
  • Borrow focuses on the one receiving (the one upon whom the action is done).

 

Here are some examples:

I asked her if I could borrow some money.

I asked her if she could lend me some money.

Did you borrow it from her?

Did she lend it to you?

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

Have you had trouble with borrow or lend?

Tell us your story in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_193_How_to_Borrow_Money_in_English_Correctly.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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How do you make small talk in English interesting?

Does it always have to be boring?

Today we talk with Chris Colin about how you can generate great small talk!

 

Come back to our site to get more details and tips

Direct download: AEE_192_How_to_Captivate_People_with_Your_English_Small_Talk.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Can you get success by asking for it?

Today, we talk about one surprisingly simple way to get what you want in your career and life!

Come back to our site for more great tips

Don’t assume that you can’t have everything in life. A lot of times, you might be surprised what you can get by just asking.

A good strategy is to find ways to negotiate a win-win situation out of something you want.  Everything is negotiable and nothing is set in stone.

Of course, what you’re asking for has to be reasonable, and you need to be able to support your request. If you are asking for something fair and not too bold, you may be surprised to get what you want.  And if not, the very worst that can happen is you receive a No!

 

Have you ever achieved success by just asking?

Tell us about it in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_191_Just_Ask_for_Success.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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How can you get fast English improvement?

How about improvement in 24 hours?

Today, we talk about how you can go from zero to a million in English in only 24 hours!

 

Come back to our site for more tips

 

We all want to be fluent and sound like a native speaker. But we all want it fast! What can you do to get you closer to your goal in only 24 hours?

One thing is to break you bigger goal into smaller, actionable steps that you can actually accomplish. Think about all the little things related to your goal, and what you can do to make them work for you.  Think small, but think hard. There are opportunities for improvement everywhere.

Think also about how you can connect, whether it be to people or the language itself. What small connections can you find or make in a very short time?

 

How will you get closer to your goal in 24 hours?

Any ideas?

Share them with us in the comments section below!


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Talking about your past, should you say did or have done?

Today, in #9 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, we’ll be discussing how to handle past experiences and accomplishments in English!

If somebody says, “I have done that,” how is it different from saying “I did that?”  The difference can seem tricky but the key is the context.

 

Here is a simple way to think about this:

  • When using have done, you are zooming out, outside of yourself and to a big picture.  You might be talking about your entire lifetime, or the distant past.
  • When using did, you are zooming in to something more recent and maybe more simple.  You may also be talking about a specific time period that is now over.

 

Here are some more examples:

  • “I did go to Paris last week.”
  • “I didn’t watch any TV yesterday.”
  • “I have been to Paris, but not since childhood.”
  • “I have watched a lot of TV in my lifetime.”

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

Tell us some of your experiences or accomplishments in the comments section below!

Direct download: AEE_189_Your_Last_English_Grammar_Problem_Solved.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Can you be happy every day?

If so, what does it take?

Today, we talk with Michael about what you can do to live every day like a vacation!

Come back to our site for more tips and a summary

Direct download: AEE_188_How_to_Be_Happy_Like_Every_Day_is_a_Vacation.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Are you an active English learner?

Or are you waiting for us to give you better English skills?

Today we talk about how improving your English is about what you do, not what we do!

A teacher can only support you and give you the tools you need to help yourself. But improving your English is your responsibility!  Never say “I hope you can improve my English.”  Instead ask yourself, “How can I use All Ears English as a tool to improve my English?

 

Come back to our site for more tips and links

 

Direct download: AEE_187_Why_We_Wont_Make_Your_Bad_English_Good.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Do you want to speak English like a native?

Today we chat with Drew Badger, host of English Anyone, about 3 tips to help you achieve fluency!

We become fluent in our native language by connecting to others. Drew believes we should use the same behavior to get fluent in other languages.  In other words, be a speaker, not just a learner!

 

Come back to our site for links and more info


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Are you interested, or interesting?

What’s the difference?

Today, in #10 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, we’ll be discussing when to use the -ed and -ing endings! 

To be interested is not the same as being interesting.  The same applies to other English phrases such as bored and boring, or excited and exciting.  Here is a general rule to help you remember the difference:

  • When talking about yourself or your feelings, use the –ed ending.  "I am interested in music."
  • When talking about others or something outside yourself, use the –ing ending.  "That music is interesting."

 

Here are some more examples:

  • "She's excited by travel."
  • "Travel is exciting."
  • "They're bored by soccer."
  • "Soccer is boring."

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

What do you find interesting, boring or amazing?

What isn’t interesting, boring or amazing?

Tell us in the comments section below!

 


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Do you need a plan to learn English?

Do you have so many learning resources you’re overwhelmed?

Today we discuss why you need to stop trying to do it all and start creating an English plan!

 

Come back to our post for more tips and a summary

Direct download: AEE_184_Stop_Over-consuming_and_Start_with_an_English_Plan.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Do you control your life?

Or is your life controlled by all of the work, responsibilities and people you know?

Today we talk with Stephen Warley from Unstuckable about how take back your life by getting unstuck!

Sometimes life can make you feel "stuck" when you don't have the time or energy to do what you want to do.  Stephen says it doesn't have to be this way, if you know how to get unstuck.

Come back to our site to get a summary and more tips


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Can you learn English like an entrepreneur?

Today we talk with successful New York entrepreneur Kristy Oshita about how starting a business  can compare to learning English!

Entrepreneurs must to work at least as hard as English learners for success.  They have to know how to use their time, focus their energy and maintain their sanity.

 

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The English future tense can be tricky.

Today, in #11 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, we’ll be discussing the most common mistake with the future tense of English!

Come back to our site to get the details

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

 

 

Direct download: AEE_181_Will_Lindsay_Go_to_Japan_Future_Tense_in_English.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Native English speakers often break grammar rules – did you know that?

Today we discuss six common ways native English speakers mistakenly speak their own language!

Language creates culture, and people talk the way they want to be seen.  Sometimes this means being loose with the language, whether using slang or speaking in a way that is more comfortable than right.

 

Come back to the site to get the phrases in writing


What is the most productive way to learn English?

Are there strategies you can use to improve productivity in language learning?

Today we talk with productivity expert Thomas Frank about three ways to learn English faster!

Thomas believes a big part of success in learning a language has to do with how you manage your time.  By using certain strategic behaviors, he says that you can get more and better learning, faster.

The top 3 three tips for improving English learning productivity:

Come back to our site to get the top 3 tips

Direct download: 179_AEE_179__Thomas_Frank_on_Momentum_Missions_and_Motivation.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Can you learn English like a game?

Can it be fun and addictive rather than just work?

Today we talk with Geremie, an entrepreneur who says that gaming can show us how to make learning English more interesting and enjoyable!

Geremie says we can learn from the psychological incentives that video games give us to keep playing, and that these lessons can help with motivation and ultimate success in learning English.

Come back to our site to get the 3 lessons
Direct download: 178_AEE_178__Gaming_Will_Change_How_You_Learn_English.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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When and how do you talk about age in English?

Today, in #12 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, we’ll be discussing what is polite (and not so polite) about doing this in America!

Come back to our site to get more tips

 

Other Entries in the 15 Fixes Series:

Direct download: 177_AEE_177__When_and_How_do_You_Talk_About_Age_in_English_.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Learning English pronunciation can be tricky.  But is it possible to learn it better and faster?

Singer Lydia Lyon does not speak Arabic.  But when she sings in Arabic, she sounds just like a native speaker.

Today we talk to Lydia about how she learned the pronunciation without knowing the language!

Come back to our post to learn more


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How can you treat English as part of your art?

Have you thought about what your legacy will be?

Today we talk about how your learning English a part of how people will remember you when you're gone.

Come back to our site to learn more

Direct download: 175_AEE_175__How_to_Craft_Your_Art_Through_English_in_28000_Days.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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How can you think in English?

Today, we talk with Shayna Oliveira from espressoenglish.net about three levels to start thinking your way to fluency!

Many language learners believe that you must be advanced or even fluent before you can think in that language.  Shayna believes you can start developing that skill when you are a beginner.

Come back to the blog to get more details from Shayna

Direct download: 174_AEE_174__How_to_Think_in_English_with_Shayna_from_Espresso_English.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Wish and Hope in English are similar, but not exactly the same. 

Today, in #13 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, find out how to correctly use the verbs Wish and Hope!

Come back to our site to get the differences between wish and hope

Direct download: 173_AEE_173__Wish_vs._Hope_in_English_-_Whats_the_Difference_.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Homophones can be dangerous.

But understanding them can help push your English to the next level.

Today we chat with Tim Torkildson, an ESL blogger who was fired from his job for blogging about homophones!

A homophone is a word that has the same pronunciation as another word, but a different spelling and meaning.  Though not all languages have homophones, English has a lot of them.

Come back to our site to get more details on homophones

Direct download: 172_AEE_172__Homophones_to_Push_Your_English_to_the_Next_Level.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Do you want to eat like a New Englander, but you're afraid of gaining weight?

Today we talk to food blogger Grace Lentini about the food of New England, and how to eat it!

When in New England, you've got to try the seafood.  Boston had a huge fishing industry, Maine is famous for lobster, and Rhode Island is a great place to find calamari.

Come back to our site for a summary


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Do you have healthy English?

Do you approach your English like a doctor would?

Today we share five tips to keep your English healthy by thinking like a doctor!

A good doctor has many qualities.  Here are five that can be applied to learning English:

Come back to our site for more details


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Do you speak, talk, tell or say?

Today, in #14 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, we’ll be discussing how to correctly use the verbs Speak, Talk, Tell and Say, and how to think about them so you don’t mix them up!

Speak, Talk, Tell and Say all mean almost the same thing: to communicate verbally.  But even though they seem to be interchangeable, their meanings are different.  It's important to use them correctly!

Come back to our site to get the differences between all 4 verbs

Direct download: 169_AEE_169__Speak_Talk_Tell_and_Say_--_How_to_Use_Them_Right_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Do you know how to socialize in English?

Have you been to any social events lately?

Today, we discuss three phrases that will help you be a smooth communicator at your next social event!

Socializing is an art.   It's important to be smooth and confident, but also to say the right thing.  Here are three common phrases to help you get started:

Come back to our site to get more tips


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Can your English mistakes help you be a better English learner? 

If so, why do we feel so vulnerable when we admit them?

Today we talk about why your brain is still stuck in caveman days, and how it affects your English success!

Come back to our site for more tips

Direct download: 167_AEE_167__Can_You_Find_Power_in_Your_English_Mistakes_.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Can your home make you successful in the US?

Today we discuss 3 ways your apartment can make you successful in the U.S.

Come back to our site to learn more

 


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Do you listen or do you hear?  What’s the difference in English?

Today, in #15 of our countdown of the Top 15 Fixes in English series, we’ll be discussing the difference between listen and hear, and how to think about them so you don’t mix them up!

Come back to our site to get more info

 

Direct download: 165_AEE_165__Listen_or_Hear__Whats_the_difference_.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Today you'll get 3 English meal phrases to dine with native speakers!

Dining is a great time to socialize and connect.  But you can’t just listen to yourself chewing food – you have to be active and engaged with others!  But what do you talk about?  How should you start?

Come back to our site to get the 3 phrases

Direct download: 164_AEE_164__How_Was_Your_Meal__3_Phrases_TO_GO.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Find out how to learn English like a chef for the most English success!

Today we talk about the five qualities of a chef, and how you can apply these to learning English.

A great chef develops his skills over many years of hard work – much like a student of English.  Here are five other ways chefs compare to English learners:

Come back to our website for more info

Direct download: 163_AEE_163__Mix_it_Up_Like_a_Chef_for_English_Success.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Can you learn English in your sleep?

Today we talk about this interesting question, and new research presented in Wired Magazine that says it may be possible!

Get more info here

Direct download: 162_AEE_162__Can_You_Learn_English_in_Your_Sleep_.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Do you panic during English presentations?

Do you worry about losing control when the question and answer session comes up?

Are you worried that you won’t be able to understand the questions from the audience?

For non-native English speakers, the question and answer period of your presentation can be the most difficult part.  Today we discuss five tips to help you take control – and stay in control – while taking questions during a presentation.

 

Come back to our site for more tips


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Learn how to network in English!

Do you go to networking events?

What do you say after “Hi, how are you?”

Networking can be difficult in any language.  Today we talk about some phrases you can use to make networking in English easier.

 

Get more info here

 


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Are you feeling unmotivated with your English learning?

Do you have no energy?

Today we talk about three ways to become a more motivated English speaker!

Come back to our site for more tips

Direct download: 159_AEE_159__3_Ways_to_be_a_Motivated_English_Learner.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Learning a new language is not easy!  Books and classes can help.  But without real conversation, you might work very hard to make slow progress.

This is because our brains learn language naturally through conversation.  Conversation is the key!

Today we talk with Kevin, creator of inglesninja.com, a site that helps people learn HOW to learn English in more effective ways.  Kevin has been teaching English in Brazil for several years.

Integrating his background in Psychology with teaching, he seeks to improve the student's relationship with English.

He believes that once one discovers how to enjoy the process of learning, progress comes naturally.

You can also find Kevin on You Tube, where he posts short, humorous (or not) videos on the most common mistakes Brazilians make in English.

 

Come back to our site for more tips from Kevin

 


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Does your English need a tune-up?

Your English is like a car.  The better you take care of it, the better it runs!  Today we’re going to help you keep your English in top shape by introducing the top 15 biggest mistakes in English!

Every Tuesday from August until November, we will talk in-depth about one of these mistakes.  We will discuss why it is a problem and give you the tools you need to fix it. 

Our weekly discussions of the top 15 biggest mistakes in English will focus on these topics:

  1. Using the verbs “listen” and “hear”
  2. Whether to use “say” or “tell” or “speak” or “talk”
  3. Using “wish” or “hope”
  4. Do you use “to have” or “to be” to tell your age?
  5. Using the verb “will” correctly when talking about the future
  6. Are you “bored” or “boring?”
  7. Should you say “I have been” or “I was?”
  8. Do you “lend” or “borrow?”
  9. What does it mean to “invite over?”
  10. “I will” or “I’m going to?”
  11. “People is” or “People are?”
  12. When to use “much” and when to use “many”
  13. The difference between “make” and “do”
  14. Are you “by yourself” or “on your own?”
  15. When to use the article “the”

Have you had problems or made mistakes with the words or phrases above?  What have you done to make your English run better?

Tell us about it in the comments below!

 

Come back to our site for more tips

 


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Game on!

Do you like to watch sports?  Do you want to be able to talk about sports with your English-speaking friends?

Today we introduce three useful English phrases for talking about sports.

Come back to our site to learn more

 

Direct download: 156_AEE_156__3_Conversational_Phrases_for_a_Sports_Event.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Today we talk to Joe Menninger, host of StartupRadio.de!

Joe is an entrepreneur from Germany who studied in Texas and China.  Living in three very different countries has given him many experiences.  These experiences have helped him as an entrepreneur.

Come back to our site for more tips!


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English is not something you can buy.  You must work for English skills!

In today's episode we talk about thinking of English as part of life, not a commodity.

It’s easy to purchase a certificate course for English.  But if your heart and mind are separated from your learning, the certificate means nothing.

In the end, your skills in English are what is important – not the certificate!

Get more tips at our website

Direct download: 154_AEE_154__Dance_Your_Way_to_English_Success.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

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Stop translating your idioms into English!

Today we’ll be talking about some of the dangers of translating “false friends.”  These are words that sound the same between two different languages, but aren’t.

We’ll also talk about translating idioms.  They can cause huge problems!

Get more tips on our website

Direct download: 153_AEE_153__3_False_Friends_Gone_Bad_in_the_Business_World.mp3
Category:All Ears English -- posted at: 1:00am EDT